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  1. Cook III, p 470-474; King: 495; Samwell: 1150-1151; Cook's order: 1534-1535.
  2. Ibid., p 474; King 496-498; 1151-1152. My "coals of fire" allusion is on is from Psalm 11.6.
  3. Cook III, p 475-476, 497, 499, 1151, 1179.
  4. See Fornander, Abraham, 1880, Account of the Polynesian Race, II, p 171.
  5. Cook III, p 482, 1151-1154, 498-501.
  6. Ibid., p 500.
  7. Ibid., p 475-478, 496-497.
  8. Ibid., Cook: p 478-480. King, Clerke, and Samwell made no mention of this substitute-beer fuss, but certain of the other literati did: 479fn-480fn.
  9. Ibid., p 479-480.
  10. Ibid., Ellis: p 479fn; 1152-1153; the fothering: p 480fn.
  11. My description of the storm is based on ibid., p 480-482.
  12. Ibid., p 490fn, 481-482, 482fn.
  13. Ibid., p 1154.
  14. Ibid., p 1155, 484-485, 484fn, 486, 488; Burney: 490fn.
  15. Ibid., King: 502-503; Cook: 489-491; Samwell: 1158-1160, 1174-1175.
  16. Ibid., p 591, 1158, 1159, quotes: 491; 1164. The Oxford English Dictionary defines "rode rusty": 504.
  17. In these paragraphs, I base my description of the ceremony and my interpretation of it primarily on the accounts given by King in ibid., p 504-507; and by Samwell, p 1159-1162.
  18. Ibid., quotes: 1169, 506.
  19. Fornander, op. cit., II, p 174. Buck, Peter, 1945, "Cook's Discovery of the Hawaiian Islands," Report of the Director for 1944, Bishop Museum Bulletin, 186, p 26-43; quote: 25.
  20. Samwell, in Cook III, p 1161-1162. See also the discussion by Beaglehole, p cxliv-cxlv; and also by Kennedy, Gavin, 1978, The Death of Cook, Chapter 21, "The Death of Cook."
  21. Cook III, p 491.
  22. Ibid., p 503-504.
  23. Ibid., p 507-508, 509fn, 1161.
  24. Ibid., p 596; on the king's entourage: 512-513; 1171-1172. James King finally learns what "Takanee" meant; see ibid., p 509 and 624. Cook and King, 1784, III, p 3.
  25. Cook III, p 510.
  26. Ibid., 1162-1164.
  27. Ibid., p 511fn.
  28. Ibid., p 510-511, 519-520.
  29. Ibid., p 511-513, 1168-1169; Nu'a: 1171.
  30. Ibid., p 515-516, 518, 1166-1167, 1171. The mountain excursion, quote: 523, 1166. Karreekea: 515fn, 1169.
  31. Trevenen's story: ibid., p 514fn; Watman's death: 516-517, 1172, quote: 517. See also, Lloyd, Christopher, and R. C. Anderson, editors, 1959, A Memoir of James Trevenen, p 22.
  32. Ibid., p 517-519, 559, 519fn.
  33. Ibid., p 516. Cook II, p 251. See also Beaglehole, in Cook III, p cxlvifn.
  34. Ibid., p 524.
  35. Ibid., Clerke: 594-603; King: 517-524, and 603-632, on genealogy: 614-617, population: 619; Samwell: 1175-1188, writing: 1186-1187, chastity: 1181-1182.
  36. Ibid., p 525-527, quote: 525; rigging: 527; 1189-1190.
  37. Ibid., quote: p 527; also 1190-1191.
  38. Ibid., p 528, 1190-1191; quote: 1191.
  39. Ibid., p 528.
  40. Ibid., p 528fn.
  41. Ibid., p 544. Much was written about the events of Saturday, February 13; by King, p 528-531; Samwell, 1191-1194.
  42. I have described this fracas on the beach on late Saturday afternoon from what seems reasonable in ibid., in the accounts of: King: 528-531; Samwell: 1191-1193; Edgar: 1359-1360; and Clerke: 531-532.
  43. Samwell reports Cook's displeasure about weapons, ibid., p 1193. Quotes: King-530, Clerke-532, 533.
  44. The events of Sunday morning immediately preceding Cook's death are reported in ibid., by Samwell: 531-533; King: 549-550; and Burney: 533fn.
  45. On the taking of hostages, see chapter 4.
  46. Ibid., p 549, 550, 549fn, 1194-1198.
  47. Ibid., p 550, 1194, 533-534.
  48. This crucial bit of information comes from James Burney, in ibid., p 549fn, although he might not have been present.
  49. Ibid., p 533, 550.
  50. For the movements, disposition, and occupants of the three boats, I rely on ibid., Burney: 538fn, 549fn; Clerke: 533; Harvey: 537fn; King: 550; Samwell: 1194; Trevenen: 558fn; and Watts: 536fn. See also Lloyd and Anderson, op. cit., p 23.
  51. The Phillips account is in Cook III, p 534-536. See also Clerke, p 531-540.
  52. See #50 supra. Also King: 549-566; Samwell: 1194-1207. Samwell, David, 1786, A Narrative of the Death of Captain James Cook. To Which are Added some Particulars concerning his Life and Character. And Observations respecting the Introduction of the Venereal Disease into the Sandwich Islands.
  53. Cook III, other accounts: p 536fn-538fn; also p cxlixvfn-cxlxvfn.
  54. I base my reconstruction of the beach scene on Samwell's summary of what he heard when the shore party returned, in ibid., p 1194-1201; and especially the eye-witness account of Phillips, p 534-540.
  55. Samwell described the village; ibid., p 1175-1178.
  56. Ibid., p 534-535, 1195.
  57. Ibid., p 535. For an excellent analysis of what happened on shore, see Kennedy, op. cit., Chapter 6, "Cook Thwarted"; and Chapter 7, "The Death of Captain Cook."
  58. Cook III, p 536.
  59. Ibid., p 1200, 551fn.
  60. Ibid., p 539.
  61. Ibid., p 551.
  62. Or did they? The July 1790 issue of the London Magazine, p 311, in a full account of the third voyage, reported that a broadside was fired at the Kealakekua shoreline after Cook's death. But no hint of any such cannon fire appears in the journals.
  63. Cook III, p 551-553.
  64. Ibid., p 553.
  65. Ibid., p 532fn, 544, 1207-1208. Lloyd and Anderson, op. cit., p 24. The Mitchell Library, in Sydney, Australia, has Cook's Bible, which was published in Oxford in 1765. No passages in the Bible have been marked, and a note attached indicates that on the authority of Mrs. Cook it is said that the Bible was used by Captain Cook in conducting divine services. I am grateful to Suzanne Mourat, Librarian in the Mitchell Library, for sending me this information in a letter dated 7 July 1978.
  66. Cook III, p 553fn-554fn, 554, 544fn, 561-562, 565, 1210.
  67. Ibid., p 1210, 544-545, quotes: 559-560, 1213; 1211-1213. Lloyd and Anderson, op. cit., p 24-25.
  68. Cook III, 563-565, 563fn, 546-548, 1213. A curious story with a possibility of truth about Cook's bones had some currency for a time. The missionary traveler John Martin was told in Oahu by a westerner that the Hawaiians kept Cook's bones and sent to the ships instead only a few bones, chiefly those of a sailor who had been killed; and venerated Cook's bones as relics and displayed them every year in a procession. Hawaiians in Tonga, said Martin, corroborated this story. Martin, John, editor, 1818, An Account of the Natives of the Tonga Islands, II, p 62-64. For a cultural interpretation, see Sahlins, Marshall, 1985, Islands of History, especially Chapter 4.
  69. For the procession down the hillside and identification of the bones, Cook III, p 1215-1217, 566, 547.
  70. Ibid., p 1216.
  71. Ibid., p 548.
  72. ibid., tally of the dead: p 547, 1208.
  73. Ibid., p 567.
  74. Ibid., p 538-539, 568. Various inquiries included Clerke's: 537-542; King's: 555-558; and Samwell's: 1198-1207.
  75. On Nu'a: Ibid., 557fn, 1171, 1202.
  76. Ibid., Samwell: 1201; Bligh: 557fn; Phillips: 536.
  77. Ibid., p 536fn-537fn, 1204-1205, 1217.
  78. Ibid., p 555, 535.
  79. Ibid., p 567fn, 569-636; quotes: 576, 568. This denunciation by the Kauai Hawaiians apparently did not take hold; see: Stokes, John F. G., 1930, "Origin of the Condemnation of Captain Cook in Hawaii," Extract, Thirty-ninth Annual Report of the Hawaiian Historical Society, p 68-104.
  80. Cook III, p 568.
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