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The family of Captain James Cook

 

Thornaby, a settlement from the arrival of the Danes in 800 AD is the birthplace of Cook's mother Grace Pace.

On October 10th 1725 she married James Cook, a day farm labourer, who had come south from the banks of the River Tweed in Roxburghshire, Scotland, following the Jacobite rebellion of 1715. The centre of Thornaby has moved in recent years and is now part of Stockton-on-Tees. In Stockton parish church there is a memorial to Captain James Cook and an altarpiece made of wood from the Resolution.

Grace and James Cook had eight children. Four died in childhood. Only the second son James and his sisters Margaret and Christiana survived. Margaret married a man named Fleck of Redcar, and Christiana married a fisherman named Cocker of Staithes, where her father James lived with them. [In 1771, after the death of Grace Cook, James Cook senior went to live with his daughter Margaret in Redcar.]

At Marske by the sea, the tower of St Germain's Church overlooks the grave of James Cook senior. Mrs Grace Cook is buried with her five other children at Great Ayton. In addition to his father's roots by the river Tweed, the Tweed was the name of a ship that Cook served on in 1763 (see page 650, Cook's Log), and the name of the sculptor of the Whitby statue.

Brenda Paulding

Originally published in Cook's Log, page 911, volume 16, number 2 (1993).

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Mercedez, only two of Captain Cook's children reached adulthood, and neither James (1763-1794) nor Hugh (1776-1793) are known to have married and had children of their own.
By Cliff Thornton on 4/5/2019 2:48:21 PM Like:0 DisLike:0
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Did James cook’s children have any children?
By Mercedez on 4/2/2019 1:31:10 AM Like:0 DisLike:0
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Nola, it is assumed that James Cook's Father probably had siblings, but the church records in his home town of Ednam, in Roxbroughshire do not show any Cook baptisms after his in 1794. Maybe the Cook family moved away from Ednam after his birth? You mention Captain Cook's sister. This was Margaret Cook who in 1764 married James Fleck a fisherman from Redcar, then a small village on the coast of N. E. Yorkshire. So maybe your links are through the Fleck family?
Have a look at this website which contains the family trees of both the Fleck and Cook families.
http://www.winthrop.dk/cooktree.html
By Cliff Thornton on 1/27/2019 4:28:49 PM Like:1 DisLike:0
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Thank you very much for the siblings of Grace Pace and your prompt reply.
Would the society have any records/ knowledge on Capt Cooks Father's siblings and their respective husbands and wives? I have writings that say Grandmother Rayner was a first cousin of Capt Cook however the writings also say the connection is through Capt Cook' sister's which would need to be their respective husbands family!!!
Thank you Nola
By Nola Hodder on 1/26/2019 10:14:30 PM Like:1 DisLike:0
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Nola, thank you for your interesting enquiry. The siblings of Grace Pace (B. 1702) of Thormaby were
Thomas (Born 1698), Mary (B.1701), Mark (B.1701), Deborah (B.1704). Presumably her brothers' children would also have been cousins as well as her sisters' children?
By Cliff Thornton on 1/24/2019 4:16:58 PM Like:0 DisLike:1
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Hello, would you have any knowledge of sisters of Grace Pace. In particular a sister who married a Mr Rayner. I am tracing my Husband Rayner's Family Tree and have a record of his Great Grandfather stating his Grandmother Rayner was a first cousin of Capt Hames Cook.
Any assistance would be gratefully received.
By Nola Hodder on 1/23/2019 5:29:29 AM Like:0 DisLike:1
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I hope this will help me with my report...
By Dirk Whatcott on 12/6/2018 11:37:34 PM Like:0 DisLike:0
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Another reason for my desire to link my Fleck family to the famous explorer is because of the sad recent passing of my first cousin, Fred Grassle on July 6th this year. Fred was also a distinguished explorer – as a marine biologist he conducted research on deep-sea biodiversity which led to involvement in the first biological expedition to survey the hydrothermal vents discovered at the Galapagos Rift in 1977. In 1989 Fred joined the faculty at Rutgers University’s Cook College to establish the Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences. Among other honors Fred was awarded the Japan Prize, the Benjamin Franklin Medal, the Grand Prix des Sciences de la Mer Albert de Monaco and the ASLO Lifetime Achievement Award. He has had six species and one genus of polychaetes, three species of molluscs and three species of crustacea named after him.
Vivien Wilson (nee Fleck)

By Vivien Wilson (nee Fleck) on 9/28/2018 1:10:14 AM Like:1 DisLike:0
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Re my Mitochondrial dna for the Cook/Fleck descendants – as you probably know, Mitochondrial dna is passed through the female line, but, any connection I have to the famous explorer’s family would be through my father (Frederick Hugh Fleck b.1903), his father (Frederick George Fleck b.1865) my Gt Grandfather William George Fleck b. 1835) my Gt Gt Grandfather William Fleck b.1810) his father my 3x Great Grandfather (Henry Fleck b.1776?). My dna ancestry.com profile covers both male and female genes. However, it would be wonderful to find someone with a dna match. Vivien Wilson (nee Fleck)
By Vivien Wilson (nee Fleck) on 9/26/2018 3:41:06 AM Like:0 DisLike:0
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Thank you so much for your reply. It's a very exciting time with the discovery of The Endeavour! Ancestry has found i have over 350 cousins, so one of them may well be a Flec/Cook relative. Sorry about so many typos. Awaiting new specs!
Vivien
By Vivien wilson on 9/25/2018 11:16:43 AM Like:0 DisLike:0

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